Librarian-academic partnerships

Charles Lungu, Librarian at the Copperbelt University, Zambia, reports on an information literacy programme developed by the libraries at his own university in partnership with Botswana University, and the University of Abertay, Scotland, sponsored by the UK DelPHE programme.

Higher education students and particularly those on distance learning courses are expected to be responsible for their own learning with guidance from their tutors. To facilitate this librarians and academics need to work together in the selection of resources required to support learning and to embed information literacy into the curriculum. Information searching skills and assessment of information sources are vital for life-long learning. The project therefore, developed teaching toolkits for librarians to support them as they “become more exposed to team teaching”.

Librarians and academics also need to collaborate in utilizing the opportunities offered through modern communications and software to develop new teaching and learning processes. This is particularly important for ‘distance learners’. The function of the physical space known as the library will change with digitization; so strategies need to be developed to link physical and virtual space for learning and to provide new services based on mobile phones and Web 2 applications.

From: The librarian as expert in the academy: librarian-academic partnerships, by Charles Lungu. Link. issue 14 January 2012. p.4-5. Available online to institutions belonging to the Association of Commonwealth Universities.

Jean Shaw, Phi

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About jgreigshaw

I work with Partnerships in Health Information which promotes partnership between libraries in Africa and the UK with an emphasis in African leadership. I have visited Kenya, Mali, Uganda and Zambia though Phi has contacts in many more African countries.
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